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    Fusarium species for reducing mycotoxin formation [Fusarium sp.]

    In recent years, fusarium species have been appearing more frequently in soils with reduced soil tillage practiced in conservation agriculture and in more susceptible varieties. Increasingly, mycotoxins pose problems in the processing of infected crop grain harvest and in their use as animal feed.

    overview

    Fusarium sp. - image 1

    Fusarium sp. - image 1

    Fusarium sp. - image 2

    Pest Profile

    • Symptoms & Diagnosis

      Occurence

      Fusaria (Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium nivale) in wheat, barley, rye and oats. Fusarium head blight (Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium nivale) mostly in wheat, at times also in barley, rye and oats.

      Pattern of damage

      Seedling infection: The seedlings rot and die (see also snow mold). Stem rot: browning on surface areas and dark, striped striations appear on the stalk and leaf sheaths (Picture 1). The base of the stalk and the upper root system rot. In wet weather, the infected sites are often coated with a pink coat of spores. Leaf infection: In spring, infected leaves have pale spots with dark margins. Later, irregular pale to brown-gray spots develop in wet weather. The ears can also become infected, in severe cases ears are empty (Picture 2).